Eyeview

By: David Charbonneau

David will be posting his columns every week on Thursday. He has eclectic interests ranging from social and political issues to science. He is a retired Electronics Instructor from Thompson Rivers University, former president of the Faculty Association, and curriculum writer. He now paints acrylic on canvas for Thompson Studio.

Electoral reform disappointment #3

February 9, 2017 - 5:00am

KAMLOOPS — I was disappointed but not surprised when Prime Minister Trudeau abandoned his plans for electoral reform. I’ve been let down before.

The first time was in 2005 when a Citizens’ Assembly was created to study models of reform. After much deliberation, they recommended a made-in-BC type of Single Transferable Vote called BC-STV.

The referendum was coincident with the provincial vote. Only weeks away from the vote, an Angus Reid poll showed that two-thirds of respondents knew "nothing" or "very little" about BC-STV.

The bitter side of honey

February 2, 2017 - 5:00am

KAMLOOPS — Becoming bee friendly is a good first step for the city. Now Kamloops needs to become honey friendly.

Canadian and American consumers are getting stung with fake honey. Much of comes from China, the world’s largest honey producer but you wouldn’t know it. Chinese honey is being laundered.

The label rarely says “made in China.” Instead, it will show the country of origin as being from countries like Indonesia, Malaysia, and Taiwan: suspiciously, places that ordinarily don’t produce much honey.

Pipelines are good politics, bad economics

January 26, 2017 - 5:00am

KAMLOOPS — New pipelines get politicians elected. However, they will remain empty; much like election promises that remain unfulfilled. There are environmental reasons not to build new pipelines but the economics are rarely discussed.

First the politics. Workers in the resource extraction industry like new pipelines because they symbolize well-paying jobs. NDP leader Adrian Dix learned that bitter lesson in 2013 when he opposed the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline and regular unionized workers flocked to the BC Liberals.

Kick the bucket list

January 12, 2017 - 5:00am

KAMLOOPS — Bucket lists have a grim quality about them. Once they’re completed, what else is there to live for? They nag at you. Even if life gets in the way of completion, they sit impatiently to be done. They are potentially dangerous; things you always wanted in your youth might now be dangerous or foolhardy in later years. They represent delayed gratification; a future reward for living the right life now — a bit like heaven.

Legalize heroin and save lives

January 5, 2017 - 5:00am Updated: January 6, 2017 - 7:42am

KAMLOOPS — Legal opiates are being used to adulterate illegal ones with tragic consequences. More than 800 British Columbians were killed in fentanyl-related overdoses last year. Many of them were ordinary Canadians you might find living next door. My nephew died for the same reason a few years ago.

They injected what they thought was heroin, or some other illegal drug. If they had injected legal heroin, of known purity and strength, they would still be alive. I’m not naive; they would still be addicted but their quest for bliss would not have ended in death.

Provincial health ministers should stop bickering on transfers

December 29, 2016 - 5:00am

KAMLOOPS — The provincial health ministers should resolve in the New Year to stop bickering, take the money from the feds, and use it as intended.

It’s a recurring bad movie says Canadian Medical Association president Granger Avery: “The Groundhog Day-type discussions where political leaders bat around percentages and figures at meetings in hotels have to stop. Our system needs better, and most important, our citizens deserve better (Globe and Mail, Dec.19, 2016).”

Conservatives can increase chances by decreasing happiness

December 15, 2016 - 5:00am

KAMLOOPS — The antics of some Conservative leadership hopefuls are pathetic. Chris Alexander at a rally bobs his head in rhythm to the chants “lock her up” in reference to Premier Rachel Notley, tone deaf to the toxic implications; Kellie Leitch calls for immigrants to be tested for “Canadian Values” even though no such test exists and if it did, she would probably fail.

Trump-style populism will not succeed because Canadians are not ripe for such politics –we need more inequality and the resultant unhappiness for this approach to work.

Pages