Eyeview

By: David Charbonneau

David will be posting his columns every week on Thursday. He has eclectic interests ranging from social and political issues to science. He is a retired Electronics Instructor from Thompson Rivers University, former president of the Faculty Association, and curriculum writer. He now paints acrylic on canvas for Thompson Studio.

Good riddance to B.C. LNG

August 9, 2017 - 4:26pm Updated: August 10, 2017 - 6:50am

KAMLOOPS — There were lots of things wrong with former Premier Christy Clark’s plan to produce liquefied natural gas, but let me start with the good.

At least it was a plan that labour and business could agree to. It was a provincial strategy that had workers and industry pulling together in the same direction.

It was an ambitious plan, but unrealistic from the start. Markets for LNG were weak and no one wanted to develop the plants. Now one of the last players, Petronas, has pulled the plug.

How I learned to like the monarchy

August 3, 2017 - 7:05am

KAMLOOPS — As a ten-year-old, I was eager to see Princess Elizabeth when she visited Edmonton in 1951; a year before she became Queen. My parents and I lined the street along with hundreds of other Edmontonians to catch a glimpse of her, only a few blocks from where I lived.

I didn’t know anything about the monarchy. I probably would have been as enthused if she was a Disney princess. My parents probably understood the celebratory mood better. The pretty young princess and heir-apparent to the throne embodied both celebrity and power.

No internet tax for Canadian media

June 29, 2017 - 5:00am

KAMLOOPS — I agree with Conservatives who reject an internet tax to support Canadian media but for different reasons.

Conservatives reject taxes do so because they reject government intervention in what they see as a commercial enterprise. If media corporations can’t stand on their own without support from taxpayers, then they should fall.

The psychology of B.C. voters

June 15, 2017 - 5:00am

KAMLOOPS — At first glance, it looked like the split between interior and lower mainland voters was along the usual lines of social values.

Cities tend support liberal social values such as gay marriage, women’s rights, support of immigration, treatment for drug addicts, and poverty reduction. Rural dwellers support conservative values such as the integrity of the conventional family, individualism, and a no-nonsense approach to addiction.

Pages